Make Place:

Talks Programme

Salford Museum & Art Gallery
December 2016 – April 2017

Make Place is a talks programme exploring domestic space and identity at Salford Museum and Art Gallery. Featuring renowned academics and artists from across the UK, the programme will contextualise Mark Devereux Projects represented artist Sophie Lee’s own artistic research into domesticity, which has included visiting the Gvendareyjar islands in Iceland to studying Salford Museum and Art Gallery’s extensive collection of nineteenth-century household objects, furniture, fixtures and fittings.

Kate Goodwin, Head of Architecture, Royal Academy, London, considers how bricks and mortar, coupled with our desire to forge safe domestic environments, influences the way we live; Gill Perry, Professor of Art History, Open University, addresses the sociological and psychological impact the of domestic environment upon our everyday lives; Artist Becky Beasley will discuss her practice and relationship to notions of feminism within the domestic environment; and Edward Hollis, Director of Research, Edinburgh College of Art, will unpick the minor rituals and routines that allow us to constantly remake the home.

Sophie Lee will exhibit new work at ArtWork Atelier, Salford, from 30 March – 9 April 2017. Inspired by Lee’s social and historical research in Iceland and Salford, this exhibition will present a new body of work that explores the home as stage, shelter and self.

Make Place has been funded by Arts Council England and is supported by Salford Museum and Art Gallery, and Salford Community Culture and produced by Mark Devereux Projects. Sophie Lee is represented by Mark Devereux Projects.

For further details about the talks programme please contact us.

Programme information
All talks: 6:00 – 7:30pm | £3 per talk
Salford Museum and Art Gallery, Peel Park, The Crescent, Salford, M5 4WU

Image: Gvendareyjar 20/08/16, Sophie Lee, 2016. Image courtesy of the artist.

Wednesday  December 2016
Architecture of the Domestic
Kate Goodwin | Head of Architecture, Royal Academy, London

How do the physical bricks and mortar of a home affect the way in which we live our lives? Kate Goodwin will consider the architecture of the domestic environment and how strive to create a safe place.

Kate Goodwin is Head of Architecture and Drue Heinz Curator at the Royal Academy of Arts where she has overseen a diverse series of events and exhibitions for over 12 years. She curated Sensing Spaces: Architecture Reimagined, (January- April 2014) at the Royal Academy and is curator of Inside Heatherwick Studio for the British Council and the GREAT campaign, currently touring East Asia.

Book now via Salford Museum & Art Gallery…

Wednesday 1 February 2017
The sociology & psychology of the home
Gill Perry | Professor of Art History, Open University

Concentrating on the roles and relationships formed within the home and family dynamic, Gill Perry will consider the sociological and psychological impacts the domestic environment have upon the way in which we live our lives.

Gill Perry is Professor of Art History at the Open University and chair of the Open Arts Archive. Her books include: Women Artists and the Parisian Avant-Garde, MUP, 1995; Gender and Art, ed., Yale UP, 1999; Difference and Excess in Contemporary Art, ed., Blackwells, 2003; Themes in Contemporary Art, co-ed with Paul Wood; Spectacular Flirtations: Viewing the Actress in British Art 1768-1820, Yale UP, 2007, The First Actresses, NPG, 2011-12. Since 2004 she has also published books and articles on the role of ‘home’ and domesticity in art and visual culture, including: Dream Houses: installations and the home, in Themes in Contemporary Art, eds Gill Perry and Paul Wood, Yale UP, 2004; Playing at Home: The House in Contemporary Art, Reaktion Books, 2013.

Book now via Salford Museum & Art Gallery

Becky Beasley

Wednesday 1 March 2017
Feminism within the domestic space
Becky Beasley | artist

Becky Beasley’s sculptures and photographs open us up into literary worlds, imagining structures and emblems of impossible projects. In this talk, Beasley will discuss her practice and relationship to notions of feminism within the domestic environment.

Becky Beasley lives and works in Hastings, England. Recent solo exhibitions include: Lake Erie from the Northwest, Laura Bartlett Gallery, London, 2016; Fall, Francesca Minini Gallery, Milan, 2014; A Slight Nausea: An Interior, South London Gallery, 2014; Spring Rain, Spike Island, Bristol & Leeds Art Gallery, 2013; The Outside, Art Now, Tate Britain, London, 2012. Group exhibitions include: In a dream you saw a way to survive and you were full of joy, Arts Council Touring exhibition curated by Elizabeth Price; Left Hand to Back of Head, Object Held Against Right Thigh, Bluecoat, Liverpool (2016); Think Twice, Whitechapel Gallery, London, 2012; British Art Show 7: In The Days of the Comet, UK tour 2010/11. Becky Beasley is represented by Laura Bartlett Gallery, London & Francesca Minini, Milan.

Book now via Salford Museum & Art Gallery

Wednesday 5 April 2017
Rituals within domestic space
Edward Hollis | Director of Research, Edinburgh College of Art

Home is not just something we make – it is something we remake, every day, day after day. In this talk, Edward Hollis will consider the ways in which the home is constructed and regulated by the routines we perform in them, from cooking to cleaning. Our homes are not just but bricks and mortar, but are also composed of rituals, rubrics, and recipes.

Edward Hollis studied Architecture at Cambridge and Edinburgh Universities; and practiced as an architect for six years in Edinburgh and Sri Lanka. In 1999, he began lecturing in Interior Architecture at Edinburgh Napier University, moving to Edinburgh College of Art in 2004, where he is now Director of Research and Professor of Interior Design. He is the author of three books: ‘The Secret Lives of Buildings’: a collection of folk tales stories about mythical buildings, published in 2009 ‘The Memory Palace: a Book of lost Interiors” and “How to Make a Home” published in 2016.

Book now via Salford Museum & Art Gallery

Produced by

Supported by